White Rabbit

by Jay Gordon and the Penetrators

Released 2010
Shuttle Music
Released 2010
Shuttle Music
A VERY RARE RECORDING FOR Jay Gordon and thePenetrators
The guitar rages, his solo's are both intense and melodic throughout this entire track. Her voice is haunting, she puts plenty of feeling into the words, she makes the 40-year old song sound modern. Also featured The Sunlight Guards The Day, more than ten minutes long, a rocker that complicates the sweetness by means of both words and the plunging forceful lead guitar work.
NOTES
"Not since Hendrix has a guitarist so infused rock and blues with the spirit of adventure."
Rock City News - G - Man

His fingers blaze across the strings spewing out notes in rapid succession like a AK47. His playing is as much a
feat of athleticism as his musicality. ***** Jim Fowler - L A Times

A great CD, a must have, for your rock collection. Limited Eddition.

While Jay's guitar rages, his solo's are both intense and melodic throughout this entire track. Sharon Butcher is in the spotlight during the Jefferson Airplane’s “White Rabbit.” Her voice is haunting, she puts plenty of feeling into the words and she makes the 40-year old song sound modern. Her voice is not one that can be forgotten easily, for she sings with passion. Her singing clearly inspires Jay’s blazing guitar while Abe Perez lays down a solid pulsating rhythm on this CD Single.
A very rare recording for Jay Gordon and thePenetrators.

“The Sunlight Guards The Day,” is a wonder. For nearly 50 seconds of the intro—an eternity in a pop song—and before we’ve heard a single word—Ms. Butcher lays down the sweetest, slow-walking bass you’ll ever hear, and Mr. Gordon, all macho bravado laid aside, picks a beautiful melodic treble on his six-string. For a couple of minutes the lyrical impulse continues, the guitarists singing plaintively about a lost paradise. This yearning gives way suddenly to a rocker that complicates the sweetness by means of both words and the plunging, forceful lead. Finally, the tenderness returns, and the song fades out. “The Sunlight Guards The Day” is a magnum opus, more than ten minutes long, and it’s genius, really, in the way it expands the world of the album.